Rabbits can’t sweat because they don’t have any sweat glands. To regulate their body temperature, they use their ears. Rabbit ears contain major networks of blood vessels, which, since their ears are set apart from their bodies, serve to cool the blood. When the weather is hot, it’s a good idea to feel your rabbit’s ears. If they seem hot, you can wipe them with a cool, damp towel, or spray them with a cool spray bottle.

The average rabbit does not need their teeth trimmed. In a small percentage of rabbits, the teeth don’t align properly and a veterinarian will need to trim them on a regular basis.

Bread is not a good treat for rabbits. The starch in bread could cause digestive problems.

Unneutered male rabbits, like cats, may spray. This is one of the benefits of getting your boy neutered.

Wild rabbits are not the same as pet rabbits. Our domesticated pet rabbits are descendants of European rabbits and are a different species than the wild rabbits you see outside.

Baby bunnies should not leave their mother until they are eight weeks old. They typically stop nursing about 6-7 weeks of age.

Most rabbits are happier when they live with a mate. However, first you must spay/neuter the rabbits. Then they must be introduced gradually. This is generally referred to as “bonding” or “dating”.

Wood stove pellets make an excellent litter. They are reasonably priced and do a good job controlling odor, plus they make good addition to the compost pile.

 Rabbits should be fed timothy hay, or another grass hay such as orchard grass. Legume hays, which include alfalfa, are too rich in calcium and too high in fat.

Rabbits do not have pads on their paws – only fur. Rabbits should have a soft blanket or rug (sheepskin rugs are terrific) and should have their feet checked regularly for signs of sore hocks (bald, inflamed areas on the bottom of the feet).

The word “bunny” comes from a separate English term bun, which was used in place of the word “rabbit” in some areas in medieval England. A third word used by Norman French invaders of England was coney, from which we get Coney Island.

Most rabbits love bananas. They should not be a staple in their diet, but they do make a nice treat, if served in small quantities of no more than a half inch per rabbit.

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